Planet Gore

Dyson speaks

No, not the inventive chap who revolutionized the vacuum cleaner, but Freeman Dyson, quite possibly the world’s most eminent physicist. In an interview with CC-Net’s Benny Peiser, he answers several searching questions about the state of science today insightfully. This exchange over the gloom surrounding British science strikes me as eminently sensible:

Benny Peiser: Britain’s leading cosmologists seem to be particularly gloomy about the future of civilisation and humankind. The so-called Doomsday Argument seems to have had a significant influence on many Cambridge-based scientists. It has induced among them a conviction that global catastrophe is almost imminent. Martin Rees, for instance, estimates that there is a 50% chance of human extinction during the next 100 years. How do you explain this apocalyptic mood among leading cosmologists in Britain and the almost desperate tone of their pronouncements?
Freeman Dyson: My view of the prevalence of doom-and-gloom in Cambridge is that it is a result of the English class system. In England there were always two sharply opposed middle classes, the academic middle class and the commercial middle class. In the nineteenth century, the academic middle class won the battle for power and status. As a child of the academic middle class, I learned to look on the commercial middle class with loathing and contempt. Then came the triumph of Margaret Thatcher, which was also the revenge of the commercial middle class. The academics lost their power and prestige and the business people took over. The academics never forgave Thatcher and have been gloomy ever since.

Lots more there, including Dyson’s reasons for distrusting global climate models. Read the whole thing, as they say.

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