Planet Gore

GE’s Lobbying to Kill GE’s American Jobs

A great piece by the Examiner’s Tim Carney on GE’s lobbying efforts to kill the incandescent light bulb in the United States, while preserving it’s business of selling incandescent bulbs overseas from non-U.S. factories. The opener:

WINCHESTER, VA.– On Thursday night — sometime around 8 o’clock — 130 years after Thomas Edison commercialized the incandescent light bulb, Dwayne Madigan helped make the last such bulb Edison’s company, General Electric, would make in the United States.

Madigan spent the rest of his shift at the Winchester Lamp Plant emptying chemicals out of machines and helping clean up the shop. By Friday, Madigan and all 200 plant employees were out of work. Those who would talk to a reporter on Thursday all had someone to blame.

Dave Rusk, retiring against his will, told me his job disappeared thanks to “a push from Congress.” The 2007 energy bill included minimum efficiency standards for light bulbs – standards that the bulbs made in Winchester can’t meet.

For now, compact fluorescents – the double-helix shaped bulbs that sell for $2 for a 100-watt equivalent – are the stand-in. GE Lighting spokeswoman Janice Fraser says light-emitting diode bulbs will be the true long-term replacement: most of GE Lighting’s research and development goes into LEDs.

“When you see the enormous savings that can be achieved by more efficient lighting … it’s huge,” said Fraser. But if the energy savings are big enough, and if the lifespan of the high-tech bulbs is as long as they say, then why should it take regulation to get people to buy them?

GE supported the regulations. Many Winchester workers, noting that the CFLs are made in China by lower-wage workers, say GE wanted to force the higher profit-margin bulbs on consumers, and Winchester is collateral damage.

Rusk holds this against GE and “the Democratic Congress” that passed the bill. “To me, it’s actually another freedom taken away from Americans,” he told me from his pickup truck as he left his final full shift Thursday. “Actually outlawing this lamp by 2014. … You’re losing a choice there. I think that bothers me more than anything. I should be able to buy whatever I want.”

Everybody has different explanations of GE’s lobbying on the rules. Fraser told me that GE had opposed early regulations that would have totally banned incandescent technology, but supported the efficiency standards as less bad. “As long as you know that the legislation is coming one way or another,” she said, “you want to influence it in a way that makes sense for your customers and your business.”

Teresa Golightly, after working her last shift Thursday, said GE CEO Jeff Immelt supported the rules to cozy up with politicians: “He got on Obama’s economic team. I feel like we were sold out.”

The rest here.

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