Planet Gore

The Steal City

As a one time Pittsburgher, having prowled the mean streets of Upper St. Clair as an adolescent, I couldn’t resist this one. It turns out that the G-20 meeting there on September 24-25 will focus — at this time of economic crisis — on the “global warming” issue. Really.

But it gets better.

Specifically, participants are going to say that those job-killing Little Green Jobs are the path out of this mess — you know, mandating energy that requires more man-hours to produce, which is to say energy that is vastly less efficient and more costly. The Steel City confab aims to lay the foundation for the only outstanding issue for Kyoto II in anticipation of December’s Copenhagen Conference of the Parties (on the heels of the pre-COP flop in Bonn), namely: How much does the U.S. pay other countries to buy their acquiesence in the sham that Kyoto II is already shping up to be.

The participants’ argument will be that Gamesa has a windmill plant in Pennsylvania, a state which used to make a lot of steel, so . . . the script of salvation really writes itself. Of course, you’re talking about one heck of a lot of windmills — it would take 5,000 windmills per year of the 80-meter variety just to use as much steel as do roof-support systems in coal mines — and that means one heck of a big economic disruption.

Even more specifically, according to Climate Wire, it turns out that some discussion drafts have been floated whose gist is that rich countries are to use “cap-and-trade” schemes to raise hundreds of billions via increased energy prices for their own citizens to transfer the money to India, China, Mexico et al.

Climate Wire reports that recipient nations are peeved because the dollar amounts aren’t specified, and they didn’t get to write the papers.

Waxman-Markey has such a provision in it already, of course, which at expected permit prices would send $2 billion per year from Americans who had to buy ration coupons or “energy stamps” to underwrite a wealth transfer to countries far too smart to bother with such idiocy. This is only one among many funds in the bill — which include, of course, the hallmark fund to compensate workers displaced by this job killer.

So we’ve got the G-20’s slogan without even being paid the big marketing bucks: Pittsburgh, the Steal City. But, what do we call the professional tackle-football squad? (The baseball team is already appropriately named.)

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