Right Field

Reveille 4/28/14

Good morning.

Here are several links from the past week that will make your Monday at the office a bit more bearable:

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Carp also managed to face seven batters without allowing a single hit. That makes sense. You have to actually throw pitches where bats can get to them in order to give up hits:

Mike_carp_zone_plot

No strikeouts — and just 14 strikes in 38 attempts — with five walks allowed. Amazingly, Carp only gave up one run during all of this, on a bases-loaded walk that brought in Brett Gardner from third. It’s no wonder he couldn’t throw strikes when you consider he was relying on a knuckleball almost half of the time.

  • Bill Chuck of Gammons Daily highlights the Nationals’ left-on-base woes in their extra-inning loss to the Padres last Thursday, and then points out that, so far this year, eight of nine teams that stranded at least 15 runners on base in a game emerged victorious.
  • Unlike the Obamacare rollout, expanded replay has not been a catastrophe, but there have been a few bugs, particularly in the way the “transfer rule” was getting interpreted. Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports broke the news that MLB has set things straight:

A catch, forceout or tag will be considered legal if a fielder has control of the ball in his glove, but drops the ball after opening his glove to transfer the ball to his throwing hard, sources said. No longer will the fielder be required to successfully get the ball into his throwing hand.

That’s it. Have a walk-off week!

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