The Campaign Spot

New Poll: Sasse Leads Tough Three-Way Fight in Nebraska

Out in Nebraska, Ben Sasse’s campaign for U.S. Senate commissioned another poll. The numbers:

Ben Sasse: 31 percent.

Shane Osborn: 25 percent.

Sid Dinsdale: 22 percent.

Bart McLeay: 5 percent.

Clifton Johnson: 3 percent.

Undecided: 14 percent.

They’re all pretty close together in terms of favorability — 57.8 percent for Sasse, 55.9 percent for Osborn, and 54.1 percent for Dinsdale — but there’s a more significant difference in the unfavorable numbers: 18.4 percent for Sasse, 25.8 percent for Osborn, 12 percent for Dinsdale. The Sasse campaign contends the high unfavorable number for Obsborn stems from recent negative television ads. The sample size is 507 respondents; the poll was conducted from Saturday through Monday. The only other poll, from February, also showed a small Sasse lead, but Dinsdale appears to be gaining ground.

Two weeks to go until the primary; the GOP primary winner will be a heavy favorite in the November general election.

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