The Feed

The Final Moments of Chris Lane and the 3 Good Samaritans Who Tried to Save His Life

In Duncan, Oklahoma, Chris Lane died pointlessly and terribly, but not alone. As he struggled to take his last breaths on a dry, grassy roadside, three people, strangers to one another and to Lane, battled to save his life.

One was Richard Rhodes, a 37-year-old contractor who was working with his partner, Lindsey Moore, painting a house on the corner where the shooting happened. Just before 3pm last Friday, he heard a popping noise and said to Lindsey, “that sounds like a gunshot” before going outside to investigate. He saw a small black car speeding off and peering over the fence he saw a woman on the phone.

At that point he thought she might have had a tyre blow out and he walked around the corner to offer to help. That is when he saw Lane lying facedown on the grassy verge.

The woman, who Fairfax Media now understands to be Joyce Smith, had seen neither the shooting nor the car, just Lane staggering over the road and falling first to his knees, then slumping forward. She pulled over and, worried he might be on drugs, called 911.

She was still on the phone when Rhodes knelt by Lane and saw blood in his mouth and on his back. Lifting Lane’s shirt, Rhodes saw a small gunshot wound high on the left side of his back. He pieced it all together. “He has been shot,” Rhodes called out to Smith, who relayed the information to police. . .

 

Most Popular

Liberalism as Faith

The British philosopher John Gray is not someone to shy away from ‘difficult’ topics. If you are looking for a provocative long read this weekend, his new article in the Times Literary Supplement ought to be a contender. I didn’t agree with all of it (for example, I would argue that the supposedly ... Read More
Culture

Our Cultural Crisis: A Kirkian Response

Editors’ note: The following article is adapted from a speech the author delivered at the Heritage Foundation on March 14, 2018. Few would dispute that we are in the middle of a grave cultural crisis. A despairing conservative critic wrote: “We are on the road to cultural disaster.” He placed the ... Read More
Politics & Policy

An Enduring Error

Editor’s Note: The following piece originally appeared in City Journal. It is reprinted here with permission. Fifty-one years ago, in July 1967, in response to an explosion of rioting in poor black urban neighborhoods around the United States, President Lyndon B. Johnson created the National Advisory ... Read More
Culture

The Mournful, Magnificent Sally Mann

‘Does the earth remember?" The infinitely gifted photographer Sally Mann asks this question in the catalogue of her great retrospective at the National Gallery in Washington. On view there is her series of Civil War battlefield landscapes, among the most ravishing works of art from the early 2000s. Once sites ... Read More
Economy & Business

How the Constitution Limits State Taxes

Must a company have a physical presence in a state for that state to require it to collect taxes? The Supreme Court is considering that question, which has grown more important as online sales have taken off. The Competitive Enterprise Institute has submitted an excellent brief arguing that the answer is yes, at ... Read More