The Home Front

Halloween Humbug

In the “terribly misguided” department: A woman in North Dakota (who seems to have maintained her anonymity so far) was planning to pass out letters about obesity to children she felt needed a warning more than a piece of candy.

“I just want to send a message to the parents of kids that are really overweight… I think it’s just really irresponsible of parents to send them out looking for free candy just ’cause all the other kids are doing it,” says the author in a Y-94 morning radio interview.

While of course we all want to see kids have healthy diets, how can anyone judge a child’s well-being just by looking at them? And whose business is it to decide which kids should be rewarded for being within a subjective evaluation of thinness — and which  should be shamed? Perhaps this do-gooder will find a better way to fight childhood obesity.


Photo from Valley News Live

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